Jacks Tyres Limited Units 3 & 4 Severn Road, Welshpool, SY21 7AZ 01938 553 554
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Motorcycle Tyre Brands

It’s impossible to over-estimate the importance of tyres to the performance and safety of a motorcycle. They are the only point of contact between the vehicle and the road, which means if they are in poor condition, incorrectly inflated or incompatible, they could be illegal at best and profoundly dangerous at worst. A rider can’t accelerate, brake, steer or corner in safety if the contact between tyre and surface is flawed. Not only do motorcycle tyres need to be maintained above the legal minimum standard, but they also need to be the right tyres for the motorbike and the best models the rider can afford.

There’s a lot of debate amongst enthusiasts over favourite brands of tyre and if you eavesdrop on a motorcycle club discussion, you’ll hear some very heated opposing views. At Southam Tyres, we believe in providing the widest possible choice which is why we stock thousands of tyres from leading manufacturers such as Pirelli, Michelin, Metzeler, Dunlop and Bridgestone. In addition to our extensive motorcycle range, we also supply niche segments including scooter, adventure bikes and 125s. While we never claim there is a right choice of tyre, every model we sell is an exceptional one. In most cases, we can supply and fit from stock on the same day or next day, getting you quickly back on the road in safety.

Understanding Your Tyre

The services of a reliable, experienced mechanic are indispensable to the motorcyclist. Most riders, however knowledgeable they are, will never be able to match professional expertise, nor should they need to. However, given the paramount importance of tyres to their safety, it is well worth being familiar with the features, specifications and codes that will help them understand their tyre and how it works.

Sidewall

The wall of the tyre is its largest part. It is the area of thick rubber which extends from the wheel rim to the tread and is the source of a tyre’s lateral stability. It is wide and flat, which makes it the ideal place to display the various codes that explain all the key specifications of the tyre. Here is a breakdown of what these codes mean.

  1. Tyre width

    This is the measurement between the inner and outer sidewalls given in millimetres. The actual width and this nominal width might be slightly different but not to any significant extent.

  2. Aspect ratio

    This figure measures the height of the tyre in relation to its width. For example, a tyre which is 120mm wide and 84mm from ground to wheel rim has an aspect ratio of 70%.

  3. Wheel diameter

    On a sports bike, this code usually consists of letters and numbers. You might see ‘ZR’ for example, in which the Z relates to the tyre speed index (Z is a rating above 149mph or 240 km/h). The R tells you that the tyre is a radial model as opposed to cross-ply construction. These letters will be followed by numbers: for example, 17 means the tyre’s diameter is 17 inches. If you see the letters M/C following the diameter measurement, this indicates that the tyre is designed for a motorbike. It’s noticeable that imperial and metric measures are used side by side, but as this has become the de facto practice, there is unlikely to be any change in the standard for the foreseeable future.

  4. Load Index

    Finally, you will see numbers and a letter or two in brackets. The numbers identify the maximum load which the tyre can safely carry when properly inflated. There is a long list of load index values available on many websites or at your local garage. 58, for example, equates to a load-bearing capacity of not more than 236kg.

  5. Speed Rating

    The letter which follows the load index numbers tells you the maximum speed at which the tyre can safely travel, fully inflated and carrying the maximum load. Again, there is an easily accessible table that gives all the speed rating values. For example, ‘W’ denotes a maximum speed of 270km/h.

    When choosing tyres, it’s important to use the load index and speed rating in conjunction with the specifications of the motorcycle to avoid a mismatch that could compromise performance and safety.

Tread

This is probably the best-known feature of a tyre, largely because there are frequent reminders on websites and in garage waiting rooms. The trick of using a credit card to measure tread depth makes it easy to appreciate the issue, and some breakdown service membership cards even carry a hatch mark to measure the legal minimum.

The tread is that part of the tyre which is in contact with the road. It is the softest part, providing grip and cushioning. The pattern of the tread and the compound used varies from tyre to tyre, but every design is created to maximise safety, performance and road handling. The minimum depth that the law demands is 1.6mm but it is recommended that tyres should be replaced once the tread has worn down to 3mm.

Beads

These are the parts of the tyre which form an airtight seal between the wheel rim and the tyre. They are made from very strong braided steel which is coated in rubber. If a bead fails, it can cause the tyre to blow out.

Shoulder

This is the rounded area where the tread and sidewall meet. It plays an important role when a rider needs to lean the bike in a manoeuvre such as cornering, since it then takes most of the pressure.

Belts

Made of steel or aramid, these are placed across the tyre between the tread and plies (see below) to keep the plies in place, to help the tread remain in contact with the road, to provide puncture resistance and to increase the rigidity of the tyre.

Plies

These are the layers of compound that form the skeleton of the tyre, usually woven cords coated in rubber. They provide the necessary flexibility for safe riding without being overly elastic.

The Tyres Range

Avon

Known for single-handedly preventing the demise of sidecar racing, Avon also dominates classic racing and is increasing its influence in modern solo road racing. The company has been manufacturing motorcycle tyres for well over 100 years and supports motorbike racing at all levels from international events to grassroots club racing.

Bridgestone

As a manufacturer of premium motorcycle and scooter tyres, Bridgestone makes products that are OEM fit for the majority of motorbike manufacturers. Their range includes the Battlax series, the Trail Wing and VO2 slicks for use on track days.

Continental

Founded in 1871, 15 years before the invention of the automobile, Continental can claim to be a major part of the history of tyre design and production. Not only are they one of the world’s largest manufacturers of tyres, but their sports touring range has won several industry awards.

Dunlop

Serving the motorcycle and automobile industry since 1888, Dunlop is virtually synonymous with motorsport. Every one of the 18 rider and lap records achieved at the TT were set by riders using Dunlop tyres. The company is the official supplier to the Moto2 and Moto3 world championships.

Metzeler

Founded in Germany in 1863 and owned by Pirelli since 1986, the Metzeler brand is known for its exceptional touring tyres but they also produce a varied and high-quality range of sports and track tyres as well as the Tourance range which is perennially popular with adventure tourers.

Michelin

Another iconic brand, Michelin manufactures tyres for all kinds of two-wheelers from scooters to superbikes. Their Pilot Road series is a world-class range, and their Anakee range is the first choice for many adventure-bike riders. Michelin is the official supplier to MotoGP.

Pirelli

Founded in Milan in 1872, Pirelli expanded across many industry sectors before returning to its roots in the 21st century as a pure tyre manufacturer. It has deep roots in motorsport, but also produces the Scorpion Trail tyre for adventure bikes and the award-winning Angel GT2 touring tyre.

Tyre Categories

Road tyres

Most riders use their motorbikes for normal daily journeys, commutes and occasional leisure journeys. At Southam Tyres, we stock thousands of tyres for every make and model of motorbike, offering the very best road performance.

Off-Road tyres

The terrains faced by off-road riders can vary enormously between soft, hard and medium, so we provide participants in off-roading with access to an extensive range of tyres for every environment and occasion.

Scooter and Moped tyres

We stock a wide variety of tyres for smaller machines from 50cc upwards, each of them designed to the highest specifications for safe, comfortable urban riding.

Cruiser and Touring tyres

For riders who take their long-distance journeys seriously, we stock a comprehensive range of motorbike tyres for the larger touring and cruising bikes. Our tyres are guaranteed for reliability, longevity, safety, road-handling and fuel-efficiency, mile after mile after mile.

Track Day tyres

The circuit is a unique environment in which riders need tyres with very particular track day properties. At Southam Tyres, our choice of track day tyres has something for every rider, with the latest in tyre technology guaranteeing the very best track day experience.

We offer a service to motorcycle riders that is second to none. With one of the largest and most varied selections of tyres available from one supplier, we are the destination of choice for riders whatever their interests and aspirations. Extensive stocks and unrivalled expertise make us your ideal partner in optimising your motorcycle, however you plan to ride it. All we need is your bike’s tyre size so we advise on the best tyres for your preferred pursuit.

Areas served around Welshpool:

Welshpool, Buttington, Leighton, Middletown, Brockton, Marton, Chirbury, Forden, Berriew, Garthmyl, New Mills, Manafon, Llanfair Caereinion, Heniarth, Castle Caereinon, Montgomery, Abermule, Guilsfield, Geuffordd, Arddleen, Belan, Berriew, Bettws Cedewain, Brooks, Buttington, Bwlch-y-Cibau, Castle Caereinion, Chirbury, Churchstoke, Coedway, Crew Green, Bausley & Criggion, Dolanog, Forden, Four Crosses, Guilsfield, Leighton, Llandrinio, Llandyssil, Llanfair Caereinion, Llanfechain, Llanfihangel yng Ngwynfa, Llanfyllin, Llangynyw, Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochnant, Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain, Llanwddyn, Llanymynech, Llwydiarth, Maesbrook, Meifod, Middletown, Montgomery, New Mills & Manafon, Penrhos, Sarnau & Deytheur, Penybontfawr, Pont Robert, Snailbeach, The Fron, The Wern & Burgedin, Trefnanney, Trewern